2017 Enforcement Training Review

2017 Jurisdictional Scan: Enforcement Training Review
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
B.C PARKSStuart Walsh Safety, Compliance and Enforcement Officer <Stuart.Walsh@gov.bc.ca>
Question: How is enforcement training delivered to both new and returning enforcement officers (i.e. length of training, is it delivered internally or by an external service provider, learning environment/location, how often are officers required to certify, etc.)?  
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aNew staff are required to complete the Law and It’s Administration Pts I and II prior to being designated as Park Rangers. This foundational training is only completed once. These are distance ed courses completed on the students schedule. A rough estimate would be 40hrs per course. Annually we conduct Provincial Ranger Training sessions around the province for new and returning staff. Generally they are 5-7 days in length depending on which components are being delivered (e.g. if firearms certification isn’t required, the session is one day shorter etc.). Generally the materials are delivered by internal staff (peer instructors) but for some subject matters we may bring in external instructors.Majority of the sessions are classroom based but we do try to mix in as much “hands on”, scenario-based training as possible to keep it interactive.Rangers aren’t “certified” per say, but there is an expectation that they attend annual training except under exceptional circumstances.Depending on the agenda, some modules may be new training for all staff (e.g. when BC launched our Offroad Vehicle Act), or may be a refresher training module that we cycle through periodically.  
Question: How is the enforcement training curriculum developed? Who is responsible for its development and how often is it updated?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aWe have a Provincial Committee that develops the Annual trainingagenda which is approved by our Executive and then individual modules are developed provincially either internally staff or externally by contractors depending on the subject, internal capacity, expertise etc.Updates to modules are done on an as needed basis.
Question: What learning modules/subjects are enforcement officers required to be trained on to carry out their enforcement duties?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aOur annual mandatory modules are: verbal judo and defensive tactics Other mandatory components vary year to year and include: powers and authorities, specific legislation modules, compliance action planning, trespass, etc.
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
ALBERTA PARKSStephanie Simpson <stephanie.simpson@gov.ab.ca>
Question: How is enforcement training delivered to both new and returning enforcement officers (i.e. length of training, is it delivered internally or by an external service provider, learning environment/location, how often are officers required to certify, etc.)?  
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aSee attached document.  
Question: How is the enforcement training curriculum developed? Who is responsible for its development and how often is it updated?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aSee attached document.
Question: What learning modules/subjects are enforcement officers required to be trained on to carry out their enforcement duties?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aSee attached document  
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
SASKATCHEWAN PARKSBob Wilson <Bob.Wilson@gov.sk.ca>
Question: How is enforcement training delivered to both new and returning enforcement officers (i.e. length of training, is it delivered internally or by an external service provider, learning environment/location, how often are officers required to certify, etc.)?  
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aSaskatchewan uses Conservation Officers (Fish and Wildlife Officers) from the Ministry of Environment, to deliver the compliance program / activities within the park system. The Ministry of Environment’s, Compliance and Field services Branch, supervise and train the seasonal conservation officers who perform the bulk of the Park Enforcement. The permanent Conservation Officers will assist the seasonal officers on a per incident basis. We (the Parks Service) do not have our own enforcement staff. The Park Service is involved in the creation of expectations of public behaviors and the communication of information regarding the front country activities. We have seasonal staff that are call Park Rangers that offer 12 week assistance in policy communication. It should be noted that it has been 10 years since the separation of the Park Service from the Ministry of Environment (DNR etc.) .
Question: How is the enforcement training curriculum developed? Who is responsible for its development and how often is it updated?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aFrom the way your questions were worded in the email to CPC, I think you might be interested in the Permanent Officers training and their recertification’s as well as the seasonal officers. Greg Johnson is the manager of the Safety, Education, Recruitment and Training Unit of the Compliance and Field Services Branch. He would be in a better position to answer questions regarding the modules and curriculum development for both groups of employees.
Question: What learning modules/subjects are enforcement officers required to be trained on to carry out their enforcement duties?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aI have attached the syllabus from the recent Seasonal Conservation Officer training session held this spring so that you can see the flavour of the sessions. (no attachment found)
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
MANITOBA PARKSX 
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
ONTARIO PARKSInquiring JurisdictionBrendan Shepherd
Original Email: Ontario Parks is currently conducting a review of its academic enforcement training development and delivery. As part of this review, we would like to garner a better understanding of the approach used by other park agencies within Canada. Please note that this review does not include the provision of defensive tactics training. Specifically, we are looking to better understand: How enforcement training is delivered to both new and returning enforcement officers (i.e. length of training, is it delivered internally or by an external service provider, learning environment/location, how often are officers required to certify, etc.)?How the enforcement training curriculum is developed. Who is responsible for its development and how often is it updated?What learning modules/subjects are enforcement officers required to be trained on to carry out their enforcement duties? Would it be possible to facilitate a request for this information to the CPC members on our behalf? We would be happy to summarize the responses and share with all agencies after the information has been collected.
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
SEPAQ (QUEBEC)X 
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADORX 
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
NOVA SCOTIAX 
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
PARKS NEW BRUNSWICKX 
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
PEI PARKSX 
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
NWTX 
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
NUNAVUTX 
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
YUKONKatie Moen Kathleen.Moen@gov.yk.ca
Question: How is enforcement training delivered to both new and returning enforcement officers (i.e. length of training, is it delivered internally or by an external service provider, learning environment/location, how often are officers required to certify, etc.)?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aThe Park Officer Program was initially launched as a two-year pilot project in 2004 and was confirmed as an ongoing program in 2007-08. The program has seen a number of adjustments and refinements over the years in order to meet the needs of a changing and growing Yukon Parks user group and training has evolved to reflect that. Currently Park Officer training is held in Whitehorse, Yukon end of April/beginning of May for 8-10 days. 2 of those days are dedicated to firearms training and 1 day on the incident management/intervention model. The Park Officer team based out of Whitehorse has about 9 Officers any given year and is always a combination of returning and new staff. Both returning and new staff are required to go through the same annual training. Since we are a relatively small team, returning staff are tasked with presenting on certain topics giving them the opportunity to learn and better understand that topic. Training is primarily delivered internally with some external presentations form other government agencies. Training sessions on procedures, legislation, and ongoing projects are done by returning Park Officers. Sessions on bear awareness, ticket writing, and human resources is done by staff with other Yukon Government agencies. In the past few years the first day of training is done with all Parks staff (Park Officers, Park Attendants, Management, and Park Planners). This day is spent going over roles and responsibilities, procedures affecting all park staff members and as a team building day for all park functions. Training locations are a combination of in house and rented local facilities, all within Whitehorse. All Park Officers are required to certify annually.
Question: How is the enforcement training curriculum developed? Who is responsible for its development and how often is it updated?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aThe enforcement training curriculum is developed by the Park Officer Supervisor with input from returning Park Officers. It is updated yearly to reflect the changes in procedures, legislation, and common occurrences.
Question: What learning modules/subjects are enforcement officers required to be trained on to carry out their enforcement duties?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aPark Officers are required to be trained on legislation including the Parks and Land Certainty Act, Wildlife Act, Environment Act, and the Wilderness Tourism Licencing Act. Other subjects include patrol procedures, occurrence report procedures, and human wildlife conflict scenarios and procedures. We also go over common infractions and how to consistently deal with them. Below is a rundown of how our 2017 spring training was organized: Day 1 Location: Rented local facilities Attendees: All Yukon Parks Staff for the Southern region Topics: Introductions, Communications, Bear awareness (Delivered by Conservation Officer Services Branch), Human Resources, Roles and Responsibilities. Day 2 and 3 Location: Gun Range just outside Whitehorse Attendees: Park Officers, Firearms instructor is an experienced Park Officer Topics: Day 1 is the classroom session, Day 2 is firearms practical. Day 4 Location: Government boardroom Attendees: Park Officers, Park Rangers from the North, Manager of court operations to present Topics: Ticket writing (presented by manager of court operations), Topics for the rest of the day are taught by returning Officers/Rangers from the South and the North as well as the Park Officer Supervisor and the Senior Park Ranger. Topics include common occurrences, how to fill out warning books, Charter of Rights and Freedoms, conditions of arrest, and uniform expectations. Day 5 Defensive tactics training Day 6 Location: Yukon Park’s boardroom Attendees: Park Officers Topics: Introductions and vision for the season, Yukon Park’s overview and mission statement, legislation; acts/regulations as well as legislation application and scenarios, patrol vehicle maintenance and inspections, and process for common infraction. Day 7 Location: Yukon Park’s Boardroom Attendees: Park Officers Topics: Occurrence writing and filing, directives, notebook writing, motor vehicles, warning and evictions, patrol forms and collection of statistics, payroll. Day 8 Location: Yukon Parks Boardroom, Wolf Creek Campground Attendees: Park Officers Topics: Patrol procedures, pulling over a vehicle, foot patrol/orientation of one of Yukon’s busiest campgrounds.
JURISDICTIONREPLIEDCONTACT NAME
PARKS CANADADan Graham Manager, Law Enforcement Policy, Training and Standards Law Enforcement Branch Parks Canada Agency Dan.Graham@pc.gc.ca
Question: How is enforcement training delivered to both new and returning enforcement officers (i.e. length of training, is it delivered internally or by an external service provider, learning environment/location, how often are officers required to certify, etc.)?  
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aThe Park Warden Recruit Training Program (PWRTP) is a comprehensive introduction to law enforcement provided to all park warden recruits.  Candidates for this training are selected in a nation-wide competition process and must successfully complete all components of this mandatory 12 week training course as a pre-requisite prior to receiving a job offer.  The Parks Canada Agency (PCA) delivers this course in partnership with the National Law Enforcement Training Unit (NLET) of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) at the training facility in Regina, Saskatchewan (Depot).  This course ensures new park wardens have the essential, basic competencies required to undertake law enforcement work.  Duration:  12 weeks divided into two phases Phase I of the training program is normally held in the national capital region and involves approximately two weeks of training that provides an introduction to the PCA and its law enforcement program.  Phase II of the training involves approximately ten weeks of academic and skill-based training to prepare the recruits for their roles as peace officers.  Phase II is held at the RCMP Training Academy in Regina, Saskatchewan and is delivered using park warden facilitators and RCMP Training Academy instructors.  Training modules include applied police sciences, driving, police defensive tactics, firearms, drill, and physical fitness.   Return to duty:  Park wardens work year-round or hold nine-month seasonal positions.  There is no additional academic training required when they return from seasonal lay-off.   Park wardens are required to attend annual certification for skills:  PDT, firearms and judgement-based scenario testing.
Question: How is the enforcement training curriculum developed? Who is responsible for its development and how often is it updated?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aThe program was created in 1992 when the PCA and NLET worked together to develop a training program reflective of the duties of a park warden, referring to the RCMP cadet training program as the model. The program was modified in 2008 when park wardens became armed (and the Law Enforcement Branch (LEB) at the PCA was established).  Skill sessions (PDT, driving, firearms, drill and fitness) are regularly updated in accordance with the revisions to the RCMP cadet program and academic sessions are modified in partnership as required.    The RCMP owns the copyright privileges for all the academic training and skill modules delivered to park warden recruits at Depot and are ultimately responsible for content.  The PCA is responsible for all PCA sessions and to ensure that all training, including all sessions at Depot,  reflect the role and responsibilities of park wardens, that it follows PCA policy, legislation and guidelines and that it represents the day-to-day duties of a park warden in Canada’s national parks.
Question: What learning modules/subjects are enforcement officers required to be trained on to carry out their enforcement duties?
YES/NOCOMMENTS
n/aAcademic training for park warden recruits includes, but is not limited to:   Phase 1 Parks Canada Agency Act, Canada National Parks Act & Regulations Relevant Federal Legislation PCA Management Directive on Law EnforcementPCA LE Administrative and Operational ManualPCA Law Enforcement Standards and GuidelinesPCA Compliance Program     Tactical Communications CPICRCMP CAPRA Problem-solving modelNotetakingFile ManagementScenario Performance   Phase 2 PCA DispatchPCA Incident and Event ManagementElements of the OffenceParties to Offence/Acc. After factQuestioning techniquesWitness Statement TakingIMIM ReviewCharter Rights and FreedomsPowers of ArrestInformation, Summons, SubpoenasSeizing evidence, processing exhibitsCriminal CodeUse of ForceSuspect Statement takingTickets and appearance noticesOfficer Violator ContactObstruction/assault POSearch: place (risk assessment)Search:  personRelease proceduresSearch WarrantsProduction OrdersYoung Offenders ActScenario PerformanceCourt/TestimonyPCA Compliance and LE Planning ProcessPCA Service Delivery AgreementsPCA Information Management (ATIP, file security, etc.)Species at Risk Act Skills:  Advanced Driving, Firearms, Fitness, Drill, Police Defensive Tactics (PDT)   IN-SERVICE DEVELOPMENT Park wardens learn the basics of conducting interviews of witnesses and suspects while completing the PWRTP.   After they have acquired a few years of field experience, park wardens are provided intermediate-level training in furthering their investigative interviewing techniques.        In addition, the LEB works in collaboration with other federal and provincial agencies to access specialised training courses where a limited number of park wardens attend to further develop the law enforcement expertise within the LEB (i.e. Drafting Information to Obtain – Search Warrants, Wildlife Field Forensics, Major Case Management, instructor training for use of force skills, facilitator training skills, among others).   There are also training provided for park wardens in regions requiring additional designations (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources Conservation Officer Designation and Migratory Birds Convention Act).

Response Rate:  5/14 for 36%

Key Findings:

  • CPC has created a formal summary of the findings on enforcement training programs for review. 

Future Questions to Ask:

  • None

Links to Resources: